The Carlisle Mosquito Online

Friday, February 29, 2008

Wind turbine report was skewed

To the Editor:

Recently the Mosquito published an article about a resident who was attempting to install a wind turbine on his property. The article opened with the following unfortunate words: “Keith Therrien wanted to be a pioneer in energy self-sufficiency. He may end up with arrows in his back.” Mr. Therrien is being portrayed as an environmental hero who was thwarted by his short-sighted neighbors, but this is simply not the case. In fact, the neighbors were denied a fair and reasonable opportunity to have input in something that directly affected them in a variety of ways.

Here are some of the concerns that I share with my neighbors: 1.) Why was a project that could potentially have a major impact on our property and quality of life permitted without a hearing, or at the very least notification of the abutters? Mr. Minty and several selectmen I consulted all agreed that it should not have been. 2.) The Mosquito quoted Mr. Therrien that the tower would be located “far from buildings” but didn’t mention that the plan submitted puts the tower 65 feet from the lot line. If the tower were to come down, as much as 50 feet of it could land on any of three abutting properties. This is in violation of existing ordinances, and certainly is a reasonable concern for people whose property is at risk. 3.) There are legitimate concerns with ice loading, noise levels and visibility (at 120 feet on the highest point of the property), just to list a few, that need to be addressed.

I have no grievance with Mr. Therrien nor do I oppose alternative energy sources. If he, the Building Inspector and appropriate town officials had a chance to work together to address the concerns of all parties, then just maybe a way forward could have been found. This opportunity was missed.

Had the Mosquito report been more balanced, readers may not have been so quick to pass judgment. We were admonished to take “a broader view” by a reader whom I believe was not given a fair presentation of what our view was. I agree with Mr. Moulton, who wrote “it’s all in your perspective.” I wish the Mosquito could have done a better job of presenting ours.

Herb Gatti

Heald Road

Your input needed for superintendent search

To the Editor:

The Concord and Concord-Carlisle School Committees are conducting a search to fill the Superintendent of Schools position. Our first step in this process will be to establish the criteria for skills and experience necessary to perform the work effectively. These criteria will be used to measure candidates for the work. We welcome and encourage the input of citizens of Boston, Concord and Carlisle who are interested in the issues of public education in the Concord and Concord-Carlisle school systems. Toward the end of facilitating your feedback, the School Committees have scheduled two community forums —“ one for parents and one for community members —“ on Monday March 3 and Wednesday March 5. Both forums are scheduled to begin at 7 p.m. at the Thoreau School Auditorium. In addition, we have placed a survey online for community members to complete. We welcome this input in addition to or in lieu of your participation to the forums. The online survey can be found at the top of the school systems homepage —“ www.colonial.net. We encourage you to take a few minutes to complete the work and return it to us.

Michael Fitzgerald, Chair

Concord-Carlisle Regional High School Committee

Peter Fischelis, Chair

Concord School Committee

How best to deal with deer

To the Editor:

Regarding Stephen Keele’s letter, “Deer, deer, deer” (Mosquito 2/15/08), I would offer that Mass. Wildlife Department’s count is speculative at best. (There were seven in my backyard yesterday but I didn’t notice any tags.) My daughter enjoyed taking aim and shooting them; however, she used a camera. And if the deer population is 30 per square mile, might it be because we have decimated so many acres of their natural habitat?

As for the “management” of the “problem,” I cannot bring to mind any element of nature that man has “managed” successfully for the betterment of mankind. (rainforests, ozone layer?) As for suggesting management through, “archery, firearms, or primitive firearms (muzzle loaders),” I disagree.

There are accomplished archers and less than stellar markspersons. Years ago I experienced this firsthand when an arrow struck the house on which I and my crew were working. The “shooter” apologized but it offered small comfort knowing we were not intended targets. Further, it is not uncommon for a deer carcass to be found —“ with an arrow in its butt or neck —“ a significant distance from where it was wounded. To subject any animal to die a painful death of either blood loss or infection is anything but humane. And how would muzzle loaders be any different than arrows? Conventional firearms carry significantly further than other weapons and negate any 25-yard safety zone. “Hunters will tell you . . . I would add “anything” that justifies their choice of sport.

I agree the deer cause a threat, as do cyclists who travel in packs on our narrow roads. I don’t have any concrete figures but I am willing to bet more people are injured or killed in hunting accidents each year than by collisions with deer. So I would suggest if you are a landowner or a resident, should anyone ask you for permission to hunt on your property, that you ask yourself the following question: Am I more at risk from the deer in our roads than I am from someone perched in a tree in my backyard with a weapon?

Frank Sargent

Lowell Street

Beware the cur

To the Editor:

Whose woods these are I am sure you’ll know:

They belong to the Conservation Co(mm).

While skiing there the other day

I met a dog which was not a-stray.

Leashed to a man by collar and chain,

I passed it by with no disdain.

The cur, however, without a care

Lunged and bit me on my derriere!

The owner did not even apologize

After his dog launched into my thighs!

So if you visit Towle, you should beware

Of man with black dog who might habit there.

John Lee

Lowell Street

Ed.note: The following letter was sent to the Board of Selectmen and is reprinted here at the request of the writer.

Dear Board of Selectmen,

Representing Carlisle Climate Action, we wish to suggest that you seriously consider all appropriate requests for projects utilizing alternative energy sources such as wind and solar.

We feel that it is most important that Carlisle encourage methods of energy generation that will reduce greenhouse gases as well as set a constructive example for others to follow.

In addition, of course, we also encourage green living and conservation as being equally important to protecting our planet for our children.

Thank you for your consideration.

For Carlisle Climate Action

Michael Hanauer

Long Ridge Road

Fuel assistance available

To the Editor:

Is your family struggling with fuel bills? If you have limited income, your family may be eligible for fuel assistance support through either the state (through Community Teamwork, Inc.), or the Salvation Army.

Please contact the Carlisle Council on Aging (1-978-371-2895) to acquire the income criteria, appropriate application and support. If you are 60 years old or older, there may also be support through the generosity of the Friends of the Council on Aging. All inquiries are handled in a confidential manner.

Angela Smith

Carlisle Council on Aging Outreach Coordinator

Thanks for citrus success

To the Editor:

The members of the Carlisle Concert Band and Middle School Choir wish to thank you for supporting the Winter Citrus Sale. We are thrilled to announce that over 700 boxes and bags of fruit were sold this year. In addition, we are extremely appreciative of the many online orders and generous donations.

Thanks to your generosity, the funds raised will contribute to new repertoire, instrument purchase and repair, travel expenses, and new sound equipment.

If you have any questions, call Sarah Hart at 1-978-371-1101.

We hope you enjoy the fruit. Thank you so much for supporting the Carlisle music programs.

The members of the Carlisle Senior Band and Middle School Choir

Deana Saada-Smith and Megan Fitzharris, Directors

Thanks for citrus success

To the Editor:

The members of the Carlisle Concert Band and Middle School Choir wish to thank you for supporting the Winter Citrus Sale. We are thrilled to announce that over 700 boxes and bags of fruit were sold this year. In addition, we are extremely appreciative of the many online orders and generous donations.

Thanks to your generosity, the funds raised will contribute to new repertoire, instrument purchase and repair, travel expenses, and new sound equipment.

If you have any questions, call Sarah Hart at 1-978-371-1101.

We hope you enjoy the fruit. Thank you so much for supporting the Carlisle music programs.

The members of the Carlisle Senior Band and Middle School Choir

Deana Saada-Smith and Megan Fitzharris, Directors

Bravo Indian Hill

To the Editor:

This past Thursday, the Council on Aging held their annual “Valentine” Luncheon, Tea and Concert at FRS’s Union Hall with over 70 people attending. The Indian Hill String Chamber Trio, led by violinist Peter Krysa, was outstanding. This concert was funded by a grant from the Carlisle Cultural Council, a local agency which is supported by the Mass. Cultural Council, a state agency. This was the Chamber Trio’s second performance in Carlisle at the Council on Aging’s Valentine Luncheon and Tea.

The COA would like to thank these wonderful musicians, Indian Hill Music, and the Cultural Council for bringing such talented musicians and outstanding programs to Carlisle. We would also like to thank the many volunteers who helped set up, decorated, served, donated desserts and tea sets, and cleaned up for this event. A very special thank you to the Friends of the COA for providing the delicious desserts served with the luncheon.

Kathy Mull

Director, Council on Aging


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