The Carlisle Mosquito Online

Friday, June 9, 2006

Features

Carlisle Comments: Teardowns

I fully understand why some old houses are replaced. I realize that in today's world the old saying "a forty-dollar horse and a ten-dollar saddle" is completely reversed, given the price of land today. Unfortunately, we don't seem to be able to put the old house "out to pasture."

It seems that the bulldozers are just waiting at the end of the driveway, waiting for the small old house owners to either move or die. It's too bad that so much of the affordable housing is disappearing. I know that my one bathroom, small kitchen and no closet house is on the list. Poor people. No, I shouldn't say "poor." People of average income shouldn't have to live in a small, sub-standard house. But small is something I can understand and live in and not feel like a charity case.

Small houses are fast disappearing in this town. I feel the need to tie a string to the doorknob when I enter some of the huge places. I guess that "if you've got it, flaunt it." People about every four or five years get to turn their money over and move on to more bathrooms, more garages, and new friends. Kids think nothing about changing schools every few years, always the new kid. In the military, this is standard procedure.

People of my vintage have a whole different outlook on life. One job, one house, one spouse, very little change and less money. We live with our roots, our thirty-year friends, and most of our family. We hold to the traditions and keep the history. We see the changes, and the swing of the pendulum. We don't condemn the changes, but we do wonder just how far they will go.

Carlisle Comments: Teardowns

I fully understand why some old houses are replaced. I realize that in today's world the old saying "a forty-dollar horse and a ten-dollar saddle" is completely reversed, given the price of land today. Unfortunately, we don't seem to be able to put the old house "out to pasture."

It seems that the bulldozers are just waiting at the end of the driveway, waiting for the small old house owners to either move or die. It's too bad that so much of the affordable housing is disappearing. I know that my one bathroom, small kitchen and no closet house is on the list. Poor people. No, I shouldn't say "poor." People of average income shouldn't have to live in a small, sub-standard house. But small is something I can understand and live in and not feel like a charity case.

Small houses are fast disappearing in this town. I feel the need to tie a string to the doorknob when I enter some of the huge places. I guess that "if you've got it, flaunt it." People about every four or five years get to turn their money over and move on to more bathrooms, more garages, and new friends. Kids think nothing about changing schools every few years, always the new kid. In the military, this is standard procedure.

People of my vintage have a whole different outlook on life. One job, one house, one spouse, very little change and less money. We live with our roots, our thirty-year friends, and most of our family. We hold to the traditions and keep the history. We see the changes, and the swing of the pendulum. We don't condemn the changes, but we do wonder just how far they will go.


2006 The Carlisle Mosquito