The Carlisle Mosquito Online

Friday, March 22, 2002

Features

Carlisle takes part in the Read Across America campaign

On March 1, at 9:30 a.m., the Carlisle Public School was silent. From preschool to eighth grade, from teacher to administrator to volunteer, all present at the school "dropped everything," and read. For one half-hour the school joined the National Education Association's "Read Across America" campaign, reading as a community to celebrate Dr. Seuss's birthday. "It was a wonderful feeling, like a vacation," said Davida Fox-Melanson, Carlisle Superintendent. One of the special events that took place was the eighth graders reading to the first graders, and third graders reading to the kindergarten students. "It shows the strength of our school, that we can share reading. Everyone won."

What do people read in Carlisle?

The NEA listed favorite children's and adults' books of famous celebrities. What do our Carlisle celebrities read? Gleason librarian Connie Manoli-Skocay said, "Carlisle readers take out a mix of books," noting fiction is still more popular than nonfiction. Check this list to see if your favorite book was chosen by a Carlisle "celebrity."

Lucas Anagnostopoulos sits down with a classic, Mark Twain's The Adventures of Tom Sawyer. (Photo by Cynthia Sorn)

Leo Blanchette, nurseryman
  Children: Curious George, Hans Augusto Rey
  Adult: Hiroshima, John Hersey
Sarah Brophy, Town Moderator
  Children: The Dragons Are Singing Tonight, Jack Prelustsky
  Adult: West With the Night, Beryl Markham

Herb Campbell, transfer station attendant

 

Children: "I read encyclopedias when I was a child."

 

Adult: antique car books

Mary DeGarmo, an amazing alto in various vocal groups
  Children: The Owl and the Pussycat, Edward Lear
  Adult: Huckleberry Finn, Mark Twain

Walter H. Flannery, transfer station visitor

 

Children: "Kids should be allowed to pick their own books to read."

 

Adult: history books

Davida Fox-Melanson, Carlisle School Superintendent

 

Children: Anne of Green Gables, Lucy Maud Montgomery
Scarecrow, Cynthia Rylant

 

Adult: John Adams, David McCollough

The Universe in a Nutshell, Stephen Hawking
Agatha Christie mysteries

David Galvin, Carlisle Chief of Police

 

Children: Little House on the Prairie, Laura Ingalls

 

Adult: Inspector Morse books, Colin Dexter

Andy Goyer, Carlisle School Principal

 

Children: Cajun Night Before Christmas, Trosclair

 

Adult: Exodus, Leon Uris

Phyllis Hughes, artist

 

Children: Clarence Goes Out West and Meets a Purple Horse,
Jean Ekman Adams

 

Young Adult: Harry Potter books, J.K. Rowling
Uncle Remis: The Complete Tales, Julius Lester

Ronald Kmiec, pianist

 

Children: Wolf-eye the Bad One, Will Henry

 

Adult: Atlas Shrugged, Ayn Rand

Peg Lynch, administrative assistant at Carlisle Schools

 

Children: Love You Forever, Sheila McGraw

 

Adult: Morgan's Run, Colleen McCollough

Connie Manoli-Skocay holds two books by Lois Lenski, one an original version, one a modern colorized version, in the Gleason Library children's reading room. (Photo by Cynthia Sorn)

Connie Manoli-Skocay, Carlisle librarian

 

Children: books by Lois Lenski (The Little Train, More Mr. Small, Strawberry Girl )

 

Adult: On the Road, Jack Kerouac

Karen Morse, kindergarten teacher

 

Children: The Relatives Came, Cynthia Rylant

 

Adult: The Thorn Birds, Colleen McCullough

Rick Moscatel, Carlisle postal clerk

 

Children: Falling Up, Shel Silverstein

 

Adult: The Sermon on the Mount, Emmet Fox

Ross Peterson, physician

 

Children: The Reluctant Dragon, Kenneth Grahame

 

Adult: All the Kings Men, Robert Penn Warren
Hamlet, William Shakespeare

Penny Zezima, Mosquito production manager

 

Children: A Wrinkle in Time, Madeleine L'Engle

 

Adult: To Kill A Mockingbird, Harper Lee

   

 


2002 The Carlisle Mosquito