The Carlisle Mosquito Online

Friday, May 4, 2001

News

ConsCom supports housing plan

The Carlisle Conservation Commission (ConsCom) has endorsed the Carlisle Housing Authority (CHA) Plan 2001 for nudging the town toward the state’s long-range goal of a ten percent stock of affordable housing in each Massachusetts municipality. In order for CHA to proceed confidently with the proposed blueprint, they have been seeking the support of other concerned town boards and will ask for a vote of approval from the citizenry at the May 14 Town Meeting.

ConsCom’s backing came at their April 26 meeting where they signed a letter seconding the plan and describing affordable housing as “critical to stopping developers from using state law to obtain ‘comprehensive permits’ that would ignore town bylaws designed to preserve open space.” The letter also supported CHA’s recommendation that the town consider acquiring new land for multiple uses including conservation, affordable housing and recreation. The commission did not endorse any specific housing options presented in the plan but indicated support of the overall goals.

Copies of Plan 2001 are available for review at the Gleason Public Library, the town clerk’s office and on the web at www.carlisle.org/affordable housing.

Difficult projects revisited

The commissioners revisited three previously approved projects that have since run into difficulties. The first was a challenging landscape plan that required filling a corner of a wetland and providing replication of what had been lost in another part of the lot. Owner Gerald McCulley of Wolf Rock Road ran into trouble at the end of the process when he tried to get written verification of successful completion of the project from his engineer. Failing in the attempt, he asked conservation administrator Sylvia Willard to inspect the site. Unfortunately, she found that the replication area was too high and dry for wetland plants to thrive, and upland species had taken over. The homeowner was authorized to correct the situation himself and return for a final okay.

The second problem was reported by developer Peter Marden at a precipitous building site on Pheasant Hill Lane. Spring thaw had uncovered a breakthrough in a siltation barrier at the top of the slope. The result was an apron of silt that spread to the bank of an intermittent stream. The situation, though not considered serious, proved instructional for both the developer and the commission, because Marden had worked carefully, following what had appeared to be safe specifications. The board decided to accept the builder’s repair and “let nature take its course,” since summer revegetation could be expected to bring a permanent solution.

The final problem involved the filling of a small pool on Davis Road in the Pine Meadows development. The unauthorized action had been discussed by the planning board some months ago, but neither the homeowner nor the developer had corrected the situation. Review of the file reminded the commission that construction in that project had taken place under a Superseding Order of Conditions from the Massachusetts Department of Environmental Protection, and the by the planning board some months ago, but neither the homeowner nor the developer had corrected the situation. Review of the file reminded the commission that construction in that project had taken place under a Superseding Order of Conditions from the Massachusetts Department of Environmental Protection, and the violation was referred to the agency’s circuit rider.