The Carlisle Mosquito Online

Friday, June 30, 2000

News

Carlisle Cultural Council Opens Town Doors

How does it feel to stride the solid floorboards of a former Revolutionary tavern? Are daydreams any different when gazing through an intricate Victorian window? What can the interior of that impossibly modern contemporary be like? And what lies at the end of that long driveway anyway?

The Carlisle Cultural Council may ameliorate some of your curiosity with the Art of Living tour scheduled for Saturday, September 23 from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Attendees will receive a guidebook with descriptions of fourteen properties. Some of the sites will feature demonstrations in music, spinning, story- telling, poetry-reading, and Spencerian writing.

"Architecture is clearly important, but the focus of this tour is living with the arts in Carlisle," said Chairperson Joan Goodman. "The demonstrations of music and crafts are a big part of this." Other committee members include Maria Conley, Bonnie Miskolczy, Nancy Stadtlander, Andrea Urban, and Malcolm Walsh.

The event will run in conjunction with town exhibits. These include opening of local art studios in the Highland building on School Street, displays of watercolors and nature photography, and a viewing of artifacts from the Carlisle Historical Society.

Admission to the Art of Living tour will cost $10 per adult and $5 per senior or student (14 or under), with a $25 ceiling per family.

Cost of doing business

The Massachusetts Cultural Council awarded the Carlisle Cultural Council a grant of $3,300 this year. Most of the funds will subsidize the cost of creating the Art of Living event. The local council has also renewed two outstanding proposals: $300 to the Old Home Day Association for music, and $200 to the Gleason Library for a storyteller at its annual Halloween pumpkin-decorating gala.

"One of the reasons we decided to do the tour was to create high visibility for the arts council," said Goodman. She explained that the council is not interested in promoting itself per se, but as a resource for cultural grants. "There are a lot of hidden talents and hidden abilities in town. We saw this as a way to bring these people forward."

Goodman expects about 1,000 people may attend the September event. With the funds raised from admission fees, the council plans to apply for matching state monies, and then be able to award more local grants. The council still needs volunteers to staff

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"There are a lot of hidden talents and hidden abilities in town. We saw this [high visibility of the tour] as a way to bring these people forward."

- Joan Goodman,

Chairperson, Carlisle Cultural Arts

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various sites. Please contact Goodman for more information at 371-0724 or send an e-mail to goodink@ix-netcom.com.

In selecting the properties, the Carlisle Cultural Council wanted to show as broad a range of history and representative styles of houses as possible. Of course, the council could only feature properties that the current owners would make accessible. Several homeowners declined the honor.

If that property you're wondering about isn't on the tour, you still may be limited to your imagination. But this year's Art of Living tour can at least give you a glimpse how it might feel to live somewhere very different in Carlisle.

Art of Living in Carlisle 2000 TourSeptember 23

Site
Constructed
Significance
     
Great Brook Farm State Park
3000-450 BP* Native American ceremonial landmarks
45 South Street
1654
The town's oldest house still in use today
621 West Street 1720 Red Lion Tavern, in colonial times
1081 Westford Street 1744 Town's oldest working farm
984 Lowell Street 1828 North School House, town's oldest still standing
437 North Road
1861 Greek Revival house under restoration
46 Lowell Street 1879 Victorian house
548 South Street 1880 Country Victorian house
745 East Street 1881 The Town Farm ("Poor Farm") for the indigent
750 Curve Street 1905 Area's only working cranberry bog
262 South Street 1969 Town's first "Deck House"
97 Old Quarry Drive 1986 Unique contemporary
268 Fiske Street 1997 Modern log cabin
137 Bingham Road
1994 Example of private conservation land

*Before Present


2000 The Carlisle Mosquito